In the air

in_the_air_web

Liquid Pencil is a medium I keep returning to. It has an unpredictability that I like, surprises emerge that I can take further. This drawing is on Yupo paper, which has a plastic-like surface, not at all appealing for regular drawing as it is slippery and resists most media, but Liquid Pencil pools and smears in ways that I can use by drawing into with an 8B graphite pencil. I used an old, poor-quality paintbrush to apply the Liquid Pencil. Hairs were coming out and dragged behind adding to the unpredictability of the resultant forms. I twisted and flopped the brush in an uncontrolled way. The only level of control that I imposed was to have the marks diminishing as they came down the sheet. My favourite marks were those that were very light, they offer more opportunities for working into.

The resultant forms are reminiscent of animals, birds, insects, underwater creatures, but none are identifiable with anything we recognise.

Within our world are many other worlds, tiny, incomprehensible, outside our imagining. In a cloud of dust particles may be creatures and lives we cannot know. The creatures in my drawing come from these other worlds – I do not know what they are, but they have a beauty of their own, a history we can create for them but never know the truth of. The truth is what we make, and everyone who sees them will have a different truth.

The paper is 50 x 40 cm. Below are detail images – black and white images on Yupo are very difficult to photograph well, so I apologise for the uneven tonal qualities.

In_the_air_detail3webIn_the_air_detail4webIn_the_air_detail7webIn_the_air_detail8web

Advertisements

Small worlds

small_worlds_concertinaweb

One of the monotypes that I made back in May has moved into its next stage of development. It started as an abstract image in cool, soft colours. Then I started to work into it with coloured pencils, developing some areas, adding form and tone, creating depth and texture. This stage was quite pleasing, but I knew it couldn’t stand alone as a framed image, so I put it aside till inspiration struck for its further development, which it did last week.

mono05web
The monotype in its original state
UnderworldCloudsWeb
After coloured pencil was added, and turned 90 degrees

One form of social media I am very fond of is Instagram, I only follow artists and find it endlessly inspiring, sometimes scrolling through images something will stop me, and an idea will come from it. One thing I saw recently was work from artists in the Middle East and a small image of a mass of circles joined in a curtain-like arrangement gave me the ‘Ah ha’ moment I needed. I knew the answer to the future of this particular image was circles. I have a small tool that can be set to cut circles of different sizes, so I set it to a diameter of 6 cm and started cutting, completely randomly, deliberately not choosing what fell within each circle. Eventually I ended up with 25 circles. One of the friends that I create art with every Friday offered me some concertina-folded paper, just to see how the circles looked on either grey or white. Serendipity again – I think they look beautiful just on these concertinas! However, there are still 15 left, and these may be joined together with jump rings to make a hanging artwork, or perhaps arranged in a panel like small portholes, or they may stay solitary – the next stage will answer that question!

I have  called them Small Worlds, as that seems to me to be what they are.

Monotype miniature book

mapping4web

With a miniature art exhibition coming up, I decided to continue making monotypes, using the same approach I took in making larger works to make some miniatures. Using smaller stencils and a similar colour palette, I made a set of 16 prints, each 7 x 11 cm. Two of them happily stood alone, so I have framed them, and I decided I would like to make a miniature book out of some of the others. As usual, I went through a number of ideas and approaches before I decided on a concertina. I wanted to keep the torn edges of each print, so made a backing  from a drypoint print, printed in ochre on brown paper (see below), then folded and glued 8 of the prints down. The imagery suggested to me the views you see in Central Australia – bright blue skies, red dirt and huge monolithic rock formations, so I have called it ‘Mapping the Road from East to West’. Once the book was made, I felt it needed more depth and intensity, so with some trepidation decided to overprint it using the drypoint plate that made the texture on the back. If it hadn’t worked, I would have had to abandon the whole thing, but all was well, and I think it has enhanced the imagery, and the sense of Central Australia.

Once the book was complete I made a tag to contain all the details (the colophon), then had to decide on how it would be held together, whether a box, or a tie of some kind. The final solution was to make a slip cover, open at both ends, like the cover on a box of matches, from two of the remaining prints.

The title of the exhibition is East Meets West in Miniature – this is open to broad interpretation, so I decided to make it where East meets West in Central Australia.

mapping_singlesweb
The individual prints
Mapping1web
The book with slip cover. The colophon tag is just visible underneath.

mapping3web

Mapping_backweb
The back
Mapping2web
The book in its case, with the colophon
EastTouchesWestweb
The two individuals before they were framed.

Monos and ghosts

MonoRocks2web

MonoRocks1web

As the weeks go by, the monoprints are taking on a different character, becoming more representational but still have an abstract quality. Most of the forms are stencils, overlaid many times, with each layer responding to the previous one. I enjoy the serendipity and unplanned results, although I do plan the colour combinations with a degree of thoughtfulness.

I don’t clean the plate between layers, so residue from each application of ink remains and informs the following layers. Once I am satisfied that a print is complete sometimes I take a ghost print, which is simply the remnants of ink – some parts will continue to transfer, others will be exhausted. Below is a ghost print that initially was made after I sprayed water on the plate, intending to clean it, then decided to take another print. More layers were then added on top.

MonoRocks3web

The last image shows a set of 6 postcard sized prints which were placed randomly on the plate that produced the top image. Each one is complete in itself, but they also work together as a set.

PostcardGhosts2web

Stencil monoprints

Forest_cropweb

Each week’s printmaking session leads to the next. The stencilled birds have been an element for some time now, so I decided to use the stencil idea for more forms. The idea for this print stemmed from thinking about Central Australia, its desert landscape and massive red rocks, also the spindly, twisted black trees that are often found there. The result is not really like Central Australia, but still has an Australian landscape feel.

As the layers built, I re-used some of the stencils I had made previously. To apply the shapes to my acrylic printing plate I use a roller to apply thin layers of ink, often turning the stencils over, so excess ink then transfers to the plate as well, which is how the dark green tree forms appeared. I had not intended them to be trees, but clearly, that is what they are. The interesting textures appeared by a lack of care as much as anything else – when I finished printmaking last week, I piled the stencils into a plastic bag. This then adhered temporarily to the inky side of the stencil, making crumpled patterns, and thus was transferred to the plate when I pressed down with the roller. I love the serendipitous results of this method – it doesn’t work every time, but the good surprises make it worthwhile!

To make the stencils I used Yupo, which is a thin, plastic-like medium, like paper but shiny and non-absorbent. (I sometimes use it to draw on with Liquid Pencil, as it pools in interesting ways.) I simply draw the shapes I want on, then cut them out with a sharp blade.

Below are details of the above print, and also images of the first layer.

Rogues Gallery 2

Rogues2_framedweb

Last year I made a small book of drawings of early twentieth century criminals, (see here) using images inspired by photos from the Police and Justice Museum in Sydney, and now I’m continuing the theme, but with larger drawings. Every face tells a story – some aggressive, some cocky, some dapper, others beaten down and sad.

Photographs of some Sydney criminals were taken in an almost casual way between about 1910 and 1930, some sitting, others slouching against a wall with their hands in their pockets before more formal mug shots came into use. It seems that these photos were quite random, not all criminals were photographed, some were named and their stories can be found, others were quite anonymous, but to me every one of these has a story written on his (or her, there are women too) face.

There is a book published by Sydney Living Museums which has a lot of these photos, and this is what I have used as my inspiration. I have not tried to copy the photos too accurately, but I’ve tried to gain an essence of who these people were.

Each drawing is 15 cm square, on Arches watercolour paper, drawn using water-soluble graphite. I do a loose sketch with an HB pencil, wet it with a brush to get in some tones, then when it is dry work into it more with a 4B pencil, wet it again, and so on till I’m satisfied.

Rogues#2_10webRogues#2_01webRogues#2_03webRogues#2_02webRogues#2_04webRogues#2_05webRogues#2_07webRogues#2_06web

Before and After

mono05web2

UnderworldCloudsWeb

This is the result of drawing into one of my monoprints – the top image is the untouched monoprint and the lower is the enhanced version. In some areas I have added a lot of detail, in others I have left the original marks almost untouched. Overall, I have tried to bring the image together, to create a unified whole that tells a story. Its the kind of thing where I could keep working in to it, maybe I will, but for now I think it is done. Using coloured pencils in a limited range of tertiary colours leaves the monoprint colours intact below. However, it may end up being divided into smaller pieces, so that the eye can focus on more contained areas.

UnderworldCloudsdetailWeb

Detail.

The overall image is about 43 x 34 cm.