Sketches from Yorke Peninsula and Kangaroo Island

 

The heat, dust, flies and grand red rocks of the Flinders Ranges seem a long way away now. Kangaroo Island is cool, damp and green but with spectacular scenery of a different kind. We have found that bush camping is the only way to see the best parts of the island, as they are in the remote corners, along dirt roads.

When I last posted, we were in Wilpena Pound, a unique geographical feature of an enclosed area surrounded by a range. There is one entrance, along a creek. The outside rocky landscape is spectacular, a dramatic barrier, but from the inside the perimeter is gently rolling hills.

From there we headed south into the Yorke Peninsula, shaped like a leg. One beautiful campsite was at Cable Bay, in the toe of the foot. The beach had a rocky backdrop and interesting shells, seaweed and corals. We watched dolphins fishing and walked high on the cliffs.

A few days of civilisation in Adelaide for a family reunion, seeing people we haven’t for some time, a wonderful group of interesting and diverse people, then off to Kangaroo Island.

Once again I’m not sure of the quality of these photos, and the Internet connection is very poor, so bear with me!

imageimageimageimageimageimage

Advertisements

27 thoughts on “Sketches from Yorke Peninsula and Kangaroo Island

  1. Beautiful work Anna as always !
    What great camping trip … and yes, of course you had to camp @ Warren Gorge ๐Ÿ˜‰
    I’ve had to look up where some of these places are .. looks so wild and unspoilt .. how lovely and refreshing .

    Like

    1. Thank you Poppy – yes, we are really in the wilds in some of these places. Cape Borda is on the north west tip of Kangaroo Island, and the next land mass is the tip of South America! I am missing seeing all your posts, such limited Internet access, I will enjoy having a thorough catch up when I get home in a week or so.

      Like

  2. Sydney is going to seem awfully foreign and people-filled after this trip. A long spell in such remote surroundings must surely make one’s senses more acute and sensitive. I imagine it is so quiet too. I can see from your drawings and notes what joy you take from observing this wild world of remote Australia.

    Like

    1. I do love the quiet of remote places but I love the bustle of the city too. This trip has been fantastic but hard work too, with the extremes of temperature and lack of facilities so I am ready to come home! But these trips remain with me and influence my art and are a constant source of inspiration, so the pleasure always stays and the difficult parts recede!

      Like

    1. Thank you Karen, you are so generous! I like to make the notes, they help to add to the memories, but they are a bit scribbly – I’m glad they are even readable! Having been away for a while I have really missed keeping up with your blog, but I will delve into the archives. You are always a source of inspiration for me.

      Like

  3. Oh, to have such talent….I love these drawings, so much to fascinate and intrigue. Kangaroo Is. I must admit is a place I’d like to visit, and it’s not that far away from me, but for a car! Some of these pix would make wonderful cards and tags.

    Like

    1. Thanks Janina, I do enjoy doing these, and finding the objects to draw is a part of the pleasure too. There are a lot of coach trips from Adelaide to Kangaroo Island, some for just a day, others for a few days, and they take you to all the well-known places. There are quite a few constraints (you can’t spend as long as you want at each spot, and they don’t go everywhere, and who knows who you will be with!) but they certainly would give you a good overview of the island.

      Like

  4. Love this. They look so simple but I know anything with the grace of ease is anything but simple. Knowing when to stop is an art form onto itself. Beautiful! Thank you for taking me to this lovely spot.

    Like

    1. They are just quite quick sketches – I try to just get an essence of the place, and the objects that I find to draw, and I try to do that without overworking, but knowing when to stop is a challenge! I am so pleased that you feel taken to where I was.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s