More monoprints

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The monoprints are taking on a life of their own. When I started doing these it was with the intention of using them as a base for drawing into, but as I have become more confident with the process they are starting to stand alone. Layering has been a key ingredient in the progression, adding depth and intricacy. Each time I peel back the paper after a pass through the press I am surprised at the changes that appear.

Random additional elements, such as pieces of raffia, string, textured paper ribbon, fabric and so on add another series of forms. Once colour has been added to these, they can be re-used to offset that colour back onto the image. Stencils have added another level of interest. I cut bird shapes from a piece of stencil paper and applied them in different ways. Adding a recognisable shape has changed the character of the image, now they have gone from completely abstract images to more of a landscape, or something reminiscent of a map or aerial image. The tertiary, earthy colours that I have been using – usually a mix of about three colours – also help this feeling.

Something I am also finding is that I like the small elements of the images, in some cases more than the complete image, such as the above image which is about a quarter of the larger piece below, so I could end up cutting the images into a series of smaller pieces. (The paper I use is approximately 50 x 40 cm.)

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(Above) This is the complete image which includes the detail at the top.

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Two more details of the image.

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Two more full monoprints, made at the same time as the top one. There may be more layers added to these …

 

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Monoprints

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An area of printmaking I never much enjoyed was monoprints, but I have been converted. There can be a lot of pleasure in starting with a sheet of acetate and a selection of printing inks and just randomly adding marks. There is a purpose behind doing these, I don’t see them as artworks as they are, but as a base for drawing into, developing the marks that appear or manipulating them into a new image.

Strictly speaking what I am doing are monotypes – a monoprint is a print made on a plate which already has an image on it, usually an etching, but it can be done on a relief plate too. Instead of inking it up and printing an edition of identical images, for a monoprint the plate is inked up in a unique way that can’t easily be repeated, hence ‘mono’. A monotype is made on an unmarked¬†plate – in my case 1mm acetate, or it can be glass or any other impermeable smooth surface. Some artists do a regular painting, then transfer it to paper either by hand-rubbing or putting it through a press, but I am simply making random marks. Interesting results can be obtained as a ghost print, in other words, putting the plate through the press a second time when a lot of the ink has been lifted off. These can be beautiful, delicate images, perfect for drawing into.

The main image above is one that I have started working into, but not yet finished Рpart of the right hand side has been worked, using coloured pencils and some pen and ink, you should be able to see the difference between the two sides. Once it is finished it may remain complete, but if I find there are elements of it I like, it may well get cut up and remade into something new.

The gallery below has several prints that are just awaiting attention – they may look like a splotchy mess, but to me they are ripe with possibility! Once they are worked into I will post an update.

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