Monotype miniature book

mapping4web

With a miniature art exhibition coming up, I decided to continue making monotypes, using the same approach I took in making larger works to make some miniatures. Using smaller stencils and a similar colour palette, I made a set of 16 prints, each 7 x 11 cm. Two of them happily stood alone, so I have framed them, and I decided I would like to make a miniature book out of some of the others. As usual, I went through a number of ideas and approaches before I decided on a concertina. I wanted to keep the torn edges of each print, so made a backing ¬†from a drypoint print, printed in ochre on brown paper (see below), then folded and glued 8 of the prints down. The imagery suggested to me the views you see in Central Australia – bright blue skies, red dirt and huge monolithic rock formations, so I have called it ‘Mapping the Road from East to West’. Once the book was made, I felt it needed more depth and intensity, so with some trepidation decided to overprint it using the drypoint plate that made the texture on the back. If it hadn’t worked, I would have had to abandon the whole thing, but all was well, and I think it has enhanced the imagery, and the sense of Central Australia.

Once the book was complete I made a tag to contain all the details (the colophon), then had to decide on how it would be held together, whether a box, or a tie of some kind. The final solution was to make a slip cover, open at both ends, like the cover on a box of matches, from two of the remaining prints.

The title of the exhibition is East Meets West in Miniature – this is open to broad interpretation, so I decided to make it where East meets West in Central Australia.

mapping_singlesweb
The individual prints
Mapping1web
The book with slip cover. The colophon tag is just visible underneath.

mapping3web

Mapping_backweb
The back
Mapping2web
The book in its case, with the colophon
EastTouchesWestweb
The two individuals before they were framed.
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Monos and ghosts

MonoRocks2web

MonoRocks1web

As the weeks go by, the monoprints are taking on a different character, becoming more representational but still have an abstract quality. Most of the forms are stencils, overlaid many times, with each layer responding to the previous one. I enjoy the serendipity and unplanned results, although I do plan the colour combinations with a degree of thoughtfulness.

I don’t clean the plate between layers, so residue from each application of ink remains and informs the following layers. Once I am satisfied that a print is complete sometimes I take a ghost print, which is simply the remnants of ink – some parts will continue to transfer, others will be exhausted. Below is a ghost print that initially was made after I sprayed water on the plate, intending to clean it, then decided to take another print. More layers were then added on top.

MonoRocks3web

The last image shows a set of 6 postcard sized prints which were placed randomly on the plate that produced the top image. Each one is complete in itself, but they also work together as a set.

PostcardGhosts2web