Stencil monoprints

Forest_cropweb

Each week’s printmaking session leads to the next. The stencilled birds have been an element for some time now, so I decided to use the stencil idea for more forms. The idea for this print stemmed from thinking about Central Australia, its desert landscape and massive red rocks, also the spindly, twisted black trees that are often found there. The result is not really like Central Australia, but still has an Australian landscape feel.

As the layers built, I re-used some of the stencils I had made previously. To apply the shapes to my acrylic printing plate I use a roller to apply thin layers of ink, often turning the stencils over, so excess ink then transfers to the plate as well, which is how the dark green tree forms appeared. I had not intended them to be trees, but clearly, that is what they are. The interesting textures appeared by a lack of care as much as anything else – when I finished printmaking last week, I piled the stencils into a plastic bag. This then adhered temporarily to the inky side of the stencil, making crumpled patterns, and thus was transferred to the plate when I pressed down with the roller. I love the serendipitous results of this method – it doesn’t work every time, but the good surprises make it worthwhile!

To make the stencils I used Yupo, which is a thin, plastic-like medium, like paper but shiny and non-absorbent. (I sometimes use it to draw on with Liquid Pencil, as it pools in interesting ways.) I simply draw the shapes I want on, then cut them out with a sharp blade.

Below are details of the above print, and also images of the first layer.

Before and After

mono05web2

UnderworldCloudsWeb

This is the result of drawing into one of my monoprints – the top image is the untouched monoprint and the lower is the enhanced version. In some areas I have added a lot of detail, in others I have left the original marks almost untouched. Overall, I have tried to bring the image together, to create a unified whole that tells a story. Its the kind of thing where I could keep working in to it, maybe I will, but for now I think it is done. Using coloured pencils in a limited range of tertiary colours leaves the monoprint colours intact below. However, it may end up being divided into smaller pieces, so that the eye can focus on more contained areas.

UnderworldCloudsdetailWeb

Detail.

The overall image is about 43 x 34 cm.

Desert Morning

DesertMorningweb

The monoprints are continuing, still offering surprises. This one will be going into an exhibition in the next couple of weeks. Like the previous ones, this is the result of much layering, texture and tone being added each time. It is possible to see embossing in some of the lighter areas, created by paper ribbon and strings of raffia. I can see forms in this that can be interpreted in many ways, every viewer will have a different take on it, but I have given it the title of Desert Morning as this is what the colours and the transparency of light suggested to me. In the Australian deserts, such as the Simpson, the range of colours are astonishing, and every sand dune is patterned with marking from animals, insects, reptiles and grasses, and the marks I have unknowingly created resonate with the patterns found out there.

This print is 40 x 30 cm, using Schminke water-based inks on Magnani Corona paper.

More monoprints

mono09detailweb

The monoprints are taking on a life of their own. When I started doing these it was with the intention of using them as a base for drawing into, but as I have become more confident with the process they are starting to stand alone. Layering has been a key ingredient in the progression, adding depth and intricacy. Each time I peel back the paper after a pass through the press I am surprised at the changes that appear.

Random additional elements, such as pieces of raffia, string, textured paper ribbon, fabric and so on add another series of forms. Once colour has been added to these, they can be re-used to offset that colour back onto the image. Stencils have added another level of interest. I cut bird shapes from a piece of stencil paper and applied them in different ways. Adding a recognisable shape has changed the character of the image, now they have gone from completely abstract images to more of a landscape, or something reminiscent of a map or aerial image. The tertiary, earthy colours that I have been using – usually a mix of about three colours – also help this feeling.

Something I am also finding is that I like the small elements of the images, in some cases more than the complete image, such as the above image which is about a quarter of the larger piece below, so I could end up cutting the images into a series of smaller pieces. (The paper I use is approximately 50 x 40 cm.)

mono09web

(Above) This is the complete image which includes the detail at the top.

mono09detail2webmono09detail3web

Two more details of the image.

Mono06half2webmono06half1web

Two more full monoprints, made at the same time as the top one. There may be more layers added to these …

 

Monoprints

mono04web

An area of printmaking I never much enjoyed was monoprints, but I have been converted. There can be a lot of pleasure in starting with a sheet of acetate and a selection of printing inks and just randomly adding marks. There is a purpose behind doing these, I don’t see them as artworks as they are, but as a base for drawing into, developing the marks that appear or manipulating them into a new image.

Strictly speaking what I am doing are monotypes – a monoprint is a print made on a plate which already has an image on it, usually an etching, but it can be done on a relief plate too. Instead of inking it up and printing an edition of identical images, for a monoprint the plate is inked up in a unique way that can’t easily be repeated, hence ‘mono’. A monotype is made on an unmarked plate – in my case 1mm acetate, or it can be glass or any other impermeable smooth surface. Some artists do a regular painting, then transfer it to paper either by hand-rubbing or putting it through a press, but I am simply making random marks. Interesting results can be obtained as a ghost print, in other words, putting the plate through the press a second time when a lot of the ink has been lifted off. These can be beautiful, delicate images, perfect for drawing into.

The main image above is one that I have started working into, but not yet finished – part of the right hand side has been worked, using coloured pencils and some pen and ink, you should be able to see the difference between the two sides. Once it is finished it may remain complete, but if I find there are elements of it I like, it may well get cut up and remade into something new.

The gallery below has several prints that are just awaiting attention – they may look like a splotchy mess, but to me they are ripe with possibility! Once they are worked into I will post an update.

mono01webmono02webmono03webmono05web

Printmaking explorations

piano_tags1web

Now that the pieces for my imaginary orchestra are complete, I have been able to spend time experimenting and exploring in printmaking. In some ways, the imagery is peripheral – I am not looking to make one beautiful plate that stands alone, but create unexpected results from layering and masking, using different colours and methods. The plate used has an image inspired by the workings inside a piano.

piano_tags2webtagsweb

Luggage tags are nice small shapes to use as masks to interrupt – or disrupt – the base image. I especially like the patterns made by the tag strings. In the top image the tags simply masked the main image, but small residue marks can be seen as I used the tags on another print and some of that image was offset onto the tags. On the second one, I ran the print through the press with the tags in place, then lifted the tags off, turned them over, moved some around, but replaced them within the tag marks and ran it through the press again to offset the images back into the shapes. It sounds complicated but in fact is very simple!

The bottom photo is of some of the tags, which are now printed on both sides. Even the strings have picked up imagery. These are probably asking to be turned into a 3D object of some kind.

The prints are 27 x 39 cm, printed on Magnani Corona paper and the tags are 5 x 3.5 cm.

Music box -prints to objects

musicboxweb

Four imaginary musical instruments are now complete. It has been a journey of discovery, several ‘aha!’ moments, and as many ‘oops’ moments. On my desk are a number of shapes cut from my prints which haven’t gone together in the way I intended, and they are now waiting for a new approach. There still may be a little more tweaking to all of these, and some gluing and strengthening to make sure they will travel safely to their destination.

The prints used in these are all drypoint, some on copper, some on acetate and some on drypoint card, a lovely surface to work on. I have used a lino block too, which appears on some of the circles in Whirlygig. They are printed on 250 gsm Corona by Magnani except for the one at the front on the curved base which is on 300 gsm Voyager watercolour paper. The inks are all water-based and are a mix of Akua and Schminke.

whirlygigwebwhirlygig_inprogressweb

The two above images are of ‘Whirlygig’, in its completed state and in progress.

upanddownweb

This one is called ‘Up and Down’. You can see the print that I used, cut into 3 strips, two strips cut and folded to create pop-ups and the third makes the base. You can see some of the image that is on the back (which I forgot to photograph). These formed themselves into a stepped construction, a bit Aztec in its form. Maybe there are new directions to come!